Closing down

It’s late in the day and snowing, our first snowfall of the season here in northern Virginia.

The overcast day reminds us squirrels of how we like to sleep more in the winter, stay holed up in our leaf nests and only run around enough to dig a few acorns. So that’s what we’ll be doing the next few months. We might pop in if something excites us, but we’re pretty much putting the blog to bed like we do each winter.

Stay safe out there! See you in the spring!

Nutmeg, Hickory, Ol’ Wally and Miz Flora

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One of Nature’s Mysteries to Solve

Hey there!

Quiet week here. I think this is an easy guess of most humans, but, hey, I’ll throw it out there anyway!

Be back later for your guesses!

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All–nearly all!–they leaves on the ground here are oaks. The yellow leaves amid the coppery brown ones are  a branch form a White Oak tree. It’s one I–Hickory Squirrel–cut myself to add to my leaf nest. That’s why it’s a bit fresher than the rest of the red oak leaves that fell naturally.

Chilly nights, you know! We all need to add our layers.

One of Nature’s Mysteries to Solve

Hey there!

It’s a weekend to celebrate our mystery column: This is the two hundredth mystery post on The Squirrel Nutwork!

And what better way to celebrate than with a mystery acorn!

Sigh, isn’t that a lovely sight?

That’s not too hard, is it? I mean, to guess what type of oak tree it came from?

I’ll check for your guesses in the comments–and if you really want a hint…here is one pictured below.

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This beautiful acorn is from the Black Oak, Quercus velutina. Yes, it’s hard to tell the similar leaves of the black and red oak families apart. One way is the acorns. The Black Oak acorns are shorter and round. The leaves of the Black Oak turn a coppery color in the fall, not red like the Northern Red Oak. And, this is the best leaf difference any time of year, on the back of a Black Oak leaf, tufts of hair fill the angle of space between the main vein and the branching veins (called the axil!). Hope you human readers can see those tufts on the lower, yellowish, dotted leaf.

But either tree is beautiful to us squirrels and the acorns tasty!

And falling like crazy with the winds coming through!