Quieting down for the winter…

Eastern Gray Squirrel eating acorn

Hickory and I are closing the blog for the winter a bit earlier than last year–see our 2015 post here. We love our readers and sharing our suburban nature findings with you, but the cold weather makes us want to burrow into our leaf nests and take a break. So we do!

This is our fourth winter closing the blog. Using our sidebar menus, you can look up other posts and our thoughts about certain plants and wildlife. Or if you like our Sunday mysteries, search the title “What is it?” to test your nature skills. Our archives are still open.

Have a safe, warm and productive winter. We squirrel will see you in the spring!

Your friends at The Squirrel Nutwork.

Nutmeg, Hickory, Ol’ Wally and Miz Flora

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One of Nature’s Mysteries to Solve

Hey there!

Nutmeg and I are signing off this coming week for our winter hiatus, so here is a last mystery for a bit.

Mystery #174

This plant has held its leaves late in the season.

If you know what it is, give us a guess in the comments.

I’ll check back later!

~~~

Arrowwood Viburnum

Spectacular leaves, aren’t they?

Arrowwood Viburnum native shrub

Arrowwood Viburnum, Viburnum dentatum, is a native shrub that produces food for wildlife, too. The drupes grow from clusters of white flowers that bloom in the spring and look like look like dark blue berries when they ripen. A variety of viburnums live from Maine down to Florida and east to Texas, and feed many types of birds, including thrushes, bluebirds, robins, catbirds, cardinals, finches and waxwings.