Thirsty Thursday

 

Ol’ Wally doesn’t like the looks of the ground these days.

Wildlife and wild plants are going into a very dry fall. Please share your water in simple dishes and by soaking beneath the canopy of trees, especially tree trees.

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Thirsty Thursday

Last week I prompted you folks to leave out water for your wild neighbors, but I forgot to mention that we squirrels have noticed that some of you humans are getting creative.

This here is a new style of watering dish for bees and other insects. The idea is that they won’t fall in and not be able to climb out. So far, we haven’t seen any insects watering here. And there are plenty in our neighborhood, before you ask.

Have our readers tried this? Have you seen insects at it? Please let us know!

Thirsty Thursday

Folks, this is Ol’ Wally here with you today. This old squirrel is feeling a mite better because the heat in the Washington D.C. area isn’t as bad this week. However, we’re getting less rain, and that means yes, it really is Thirsty Thursday.

 

Do your wild friends a kindness and set out a dish of water.

High or low, or both. Different critters have different feelings of comfort approaching these things. It doesn’t even need to be fancy!

It you see a neighborhood tree with wilted leaves, set a sprinkler on it.

No reason not to share the resources with every being!

Thirsty Thursday

Since Hickory posted a colorful dragonfly statue on Monday, Ol’ Wally here was inspired to pull out some of our brightest dragonfly and damselfly photos. Enjoy!

Eastern Pondhawk Dragonfly

Male Autumn Meadowhawk

Spreadwing Damselfly

Eastern Forktail Damselfly

Ebony Jewelwing

Thirsty Thursday

Folks,

This week’s water column isn’t about water per se, but about what water does.

We’ve had a lot of rain in northern Virginia the last few days. A LOT, what Miz Flora calls ‘That blasted weather’. She’s particularly miffed because the rain has brought down flowers–from trees. Notice those white patches along the roadsides?

If your nose hasn’t been tuned upward, there’s been a fragrance in the air–the sweet Black Locust blossoms.

Yes, we know that phrase is usually refers to magnolias, but trust me, black locust, Robinia pseudoacacia, is sweet, or so we consider it, and it’s a favorite of the honeybees.

That’s what makes us squirrels particularly sad–huge numbers of bees collect from black locust during the week they’re blooming. These pea-shaped flowers hang in bunches, called racemes Miz Flora says, and they make for easy nectar-gathering.

Unfortunately, they’re also heavy, so after Monday’s storm, most of the flowers and many branches ended up on the ground, even though this strong wood has traditionally been used for fence posts.

Sigh. If you’re a friend of bees, you might want to slip them some extra food during our predicted week of rain. Good timing if you managed to get your planting done last week though! I see plenty of oaks sprouting from acorns we buried last fall.