Motionless Monday

Hey there!

We have been advocates of bees, and are quite pleased to have found the neatest bee garden statue.

And even better, this bee is on its own hive–an old-time hive!Have a great week!

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Thirsty Thursday

Folks,

Sometimes having water isn’t about a puddle, a stream, or a pond.

This here American Toad is an amphibian, and yes, they need that spring pool to lay eggs. But like plenty of other wildlife, toads can get the moisture they need if they can find the right shady spot, maybe tucked away in a shady corner where the leaves have gathered under your bushes.

Surprise snacks

We’ve had a lot of rain recently–and are swishing our tails in happiness that this hasn’t been a terribly dry summer. And the bonus is surprise snacks:

Yep, Hickory and I are coming across mushrooms everywhere. And some we are eating.

Can you eat them?

No. A squirrel’s digestive system is far different than our human readers’, so we caution against eating what we do. And we aren’t even going to attempt to identify mushrooms…because we aren’t good at it.

And P.S.: Hickory says to tell our regular readers he can’t do the mystery again this Sunday. Sorry!

Competition for the flowers

Hickory and I were doing some butterfly watching on a lazy afternoon this week.

We noticed these insects take every opportunity they can to feed, and we assume this Pearl Crescent butterfly was happy to find one Butterfly Weed in bloom when the rest are just buds. But then we noticed another insect coming in on the left.

See him, the green fellow?

That’s a Cuckoo Wasp–a wasp for the love of acorns! We backed away. But did the Pearl Crescent leave?

No.

Hickory flicked his tail from a safe distance. “Guess that milkweed nectar is better than most.”

Thirsty Thursday

Well, folks, it’s been a few years since this old squirrel has seen a good stand of Cardinal Flower, Lobelia cardinals. But I did this week.

Is that a pretty sight, or what? This of course, was down by the pond. Cardinal Flower is one of those plants that likes its feet–well, its roots–wet.

You humans like it for the red flowers, and so do the insects and  hummingbirds. Makes it easy to spot. However, pretty much only the hummingbirds are successful at getting the nectar from a Cardinal flower–or any of the Lobelia family for that matter.

Might be hard for you to tell, but this type of flower is one Miz Flora calls ‘tubular.’ Among all those fancy bits of petal, is a backend that is so long that it takes a hummingbird tongue to reach the nectar. Some of the buds there at the top are a sample of that distance.

This is a mighty beautiful plant, so much so that it has been picked to the point of disappearing. Please, if not for your friend Ol’ Wally here but also for the  hummingbirds, admire it with photos.

On a leaf

The Common Milkweed plants are mature, and the Monarchs are finding them. But have you noticed that these native wildflowers attract tons of bugs? A few years ago we showed many of them, and here are three from our recent visit.

A Carolina Mantis on milkweed leaf–an immature one, his wings are just forming.

Milkweed Leaf Beetle

Pearl Crescent

And here’s that Milkweed Community post in case you’d like to see more!