Thirsty Thursday

 

Ol’ Wally doesn’t like the looks of the ground these days.

Wildlife and wild plants are going into a very dry fall. Please share your water in simple dishes and by soaking beneath the canopy of trees, especially tree trees.

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Thirsty Thursday

Last week I prompted you folks to leave out water for your wild neighbors, but I forgot to mention that we squirrels have noticed that some of you humans are getting creative.

This here is a new style of watering dish for bees and other insects. The idea is that they won’t fall in and not be able to climb out. So far, we haven’t seen any insects watering here. And there are plenty in our neighborhood, before you ask.

Have our readers tried this? Have you seen insects at it? Please let us know!

Thirsty Thursday

Folks, this is Ol’ Wally here with you today. This old squirrel is feeling a mite better because the heat in the Washington D.C. area isn’t as bad this week. However, we’re getting less rain, and that means yes, it really is Thirsty Thursday.

 

Do your wild friends a kindness and set out a dish of water.

High or low, or both. Different critters have different feelings of comfort approaching these things. It doesn’t even need to be fancy!

It you see a neighborhood tree with wilted leaves, set a sprinkler on it.

No reason not to share the resources with every being!

Just a quick bite!

This rose-breasted grosbeak flew in and out again, because these days no one wants to be out in the sun long. We squirrels are avoiding the streets–it’s hot on our paws, and we move fast! We’re feeling sorry for those animals who can’t and hope you humans are remembering their paws can’t take the heat. Wildlife will really appreciate it if you can put out an extra dish of water!

Thirsty Thursday

Well folks, we’ve had some excellent weather this last week. Cool enough we squirrels leaped over to the big pond to have a poke around. Spotted a few birds relaxing, and Hickory wanted to steal this one for a Sunday mystery, but my water column fell first. Still, I’ll ask, do you recognize him?

It’s a black-crowned night heron, which as their name implies, are mainly active at night or early mornings. By the time we arrived, he was done with catching fish and crayfish and moving on to rest and preening.

There’s a look at some mighty fine feathers! Enough to make even a squirrel proud.

W is for Water on Thirsty Thursday

For those readers just joining us, Thursday is traditionally our ‘water day’ on The Squirrel Nutwork. So while we had thought to use a different ‘W’ for this year’s Blogging From A to Z Challenge, we can’t deviate!

W is for water…

Some places in nature fresh water is plentiful.

In others, it’s in short supply.

Regardless, we all need it to survive, whether we are water dwellers or not.

Protect your water sources.

F is for Frozen

And by frozen, we squirrels don’t mean what most of you humans are thinking…

We mean it’s gonna snow again! Yes, we are expecting below zero temperatures tonight and through next week! Please keep an eye out for wildlife–we’re as shocked as you are–and just like in the dead of winter, keep water unfrozen for us. Thanks!

Thirsty Thursday

Folks, it’s been dry this fall. But this old squirrel, with his comfortable suburban life knowing which houses have a birdbath or backyard pond the humans keep filled, had no idea the local natural waterways were faring this poorly.

Yikes, that is low for our local pond.

We haven’t had a freeze–ha, far from it!–so the place was still abuzz with insects, like this male Autumn Meadowhawk.

Despite finding the pond in less than its best state, I’m happy I took the outing while our weather is balmy.