Thirsty Thursday

Folks, we are finally getting some rain. Now a few of my fellow squirrels have complained, but not this old squirrel! Ol’ Wally knows that in July, you take what you can get.

Even if it seems our Virginia humidity has just collected up and dumped on us!

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Thirsty Thursday

end of summer rain

Don’t recognize this? Well, how about this?

rain on parking lot

Yes, folks, it rained yesterday! We squirrels were so excited, we actually scampered through the warm puddles–and there were too many! It was like the old, hard, dry ground didn’t recognize what was happening to it, and let the water run off!

runoff in gutter

That’s how dry it is. The plants are suffering, the weaker dying, others dropping leaves early, ’round here leastwise. And for northern Virginia that little bit of rain we had yesterday isn’t going to make much difference. If your area is in the same state and you can, water your plants and set a sprinkler on those street trees and shrubs–they have it the worst for trying to catch rain on the least amount of ground.

rain on Redbud

Thanks from this old squirrel, who uses those trees everyday!

Thirsty Thursday

We’ve had some heavy rains here in Northern Virginia. To give you human readers an idea of how our small ponds are taking the runoff from their surrounding neighborhoods, here is a set of before and after photos from one of our favorite ponds.

Before ~ June 17

before the rain

 

After ~ June 27

After the rain

So much rain fell in a short amount of time, the pond overflow was even flooded.

High water leaving the pond

That water sure is carrying a lot of soil by the time it hits the ponds. Ol’ Wally here hopes the aquatic bugs in there fare okay, tho he’s hard-pressed to see how the stream critters are surviving this. Tight toes, I suppose. Hope we continue to see dragonflies hatching this summer.

Thirsty Thursday

It rained around here yesterday. And when Ol’ Wally says around here, he means it. We got missed, except for a few drops.

If this happened in your neck of the woods, remember those new trees need some dampen’. This here Eastern Redbud has been in the ground for a year and a half, but it still doesn’t have the root system to deal with the dry summer.