Thirsty Thursday

Since Hickory posted a colorful dragonfly statue on Monday, Ol’ Wally here was inspired to pull out some of our brightest dragonfly and damselfly photos. Enjoy!

Eastern Pondhawk Dragonfly

Male Autumn Meadowhawk

Spreadwing Damselfly

Eastern Forktail Damselfly

Ebony Jewelwing

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Thirsty Thursday

Folks, it’s been dry this fall. But this old squirrel, with his comfortable suburban life knowing which houses have a birdbath or backyard pond the humans keep filled, had no idea the local natural waterways were faring this poorly.

Yikes, that is low for our local pond.

We haven’t had a freeze–ha, far from it!–so the place was still abuzz with insects, like this male Autumn Meadowhawk.

Despite finding the pond in less than its best state, I’m happy I took the outing while our weather is balmy.

Dead Dragonfly

It’s funny what you’ll find leaping your way along human roads. Hickory and I were bought up short by a sparkle of gold.

One sniff said it wasn’t moving again.

“Too bad. The best part, eaten by a bird.” Hickory flicked his tail.

“Is that all you think about? Stuff as food?” I asked.

“Well, yeah. But if you want to look, don’t do it here or you’ll become crow food.” He gave the dragonfly a whack and sent it onto the grass.

I followed, because, yeah, I did want a closer look. “Dragonflies never sit still long enough to get a good look,” I grumbled over my shoulder.

The green eyes reminded me of the goggles humans wear at the pool, and below, his jaw was angled in the oddest way.

“Doesn’t look like he was too happy to be eaten,” Hickory quipped over my shoulder.

No, he didn’t.

 

Thirsty Thursday

Walk around a pond and you’re sure to see dragonflies. Have you folks ever noticed some of them eat the smaller damselflies? Dragonflies are predators! Reminds this old squirrel of a miniature hawk.

DSCN2441This here is a favorite of mine, the Eastern Pondhawk–see, Ol’ Wally isn’t the only one thinking hawk! The male is easy to identify if you look for the blue abdomen and green face.

Eastern Pondhawk male

 

Eastern Pondhawk male

I’m sure you’ll be watching over your shoulder on your next pond stroll!

Thirsty Thursday

To this old squirrel, dragonflies around the ponds are dragonflies. But for The Squirrel Nutwork, Nutmeg insisted I do a bit of looking into this huge one at the pond near us.

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

The big ones are called skimmers, or perchers. Turns out this one is fairly easy to identify. You count the spots. If you count the dark ones, it’s a Twelve Spot. If you count the white ones, it’s a Ten Spot.

But the white spots don’t appear until the dragonfly matures, but the black ones are, so this dragonfly more commonly goes by the name Twelve-spotted Skimmer.

Regardless of the names, dragonflies are pretty interesting in the scheme of ponds. They are carnivore eaters, snatching other insects, usually while on the wing.

dragonfly caught by a bird

But they are also food for other carnivores, begin snatched themselves while flying!